Square Foot Gardening Forum
[table bgcolor=#000000 height=275][tr][td]

Hello Guest!
Welcome to the official Square Foot Gardening Forum.
There's lots to learn here by reading as a guest. However, if you become a member (it's free, ad free and spam-free) you'll have access to our large vermiculite databases, our seed exchange spreadsheets, Mel's Mix calculator, and many more members' pictures in the Gallery. Enjoy.


[/td][/tr][/table]
Search
 
 

Display results as :
 

 


Rechercher Advanced Search

Latest topics
» CANADIAN REGION: What are you doing in December 2017
by Kelejan Today at 1:22 am

» California's Drought
by Kelejan Today at 12:58 am

» How's the Weather Where You're At?
by BeetlesPerSqFt Yesterday at 11:46 pm

» Happy Birthday!!
by Scorpio Rising Yesterday at 10:42 pm

» Areogardening
by brianj555 Yesterday at 9:42 pm

» CarbSmart (tm) Potatoes
by AtlantaMarie Yesterday at 9:41 pm

» Third Year SFG in Canada
by CapeCoddess Yesterday at 4:42 pm

» Sweet Potatoes
by BeetlesPerSqFt Yesterday at 4:25 pm

» Spring Fever Anyone?
by Robbomb116 Yesterday at 4:03 pm

» Air Fryer! HELP!
by countrynaturals Yesterday at 1:40 pm

» Garden Clean-Up/Preparation
by countrynaturals Yesterday at 11:26 am

» Butterfly Junction
by countrynaturals Yesterday at 11:01 am

» New England December 2017
by AtlantaMarie Yesterday at 6:32 am

» 1st Seed Catalog Arrived :)
by Scorpio Rising 12/13/2017, 7:43 pm

» jalapeno variety question?
by brianj555 12/13/2017, 6:03 pm

» Sauerkraut & fermenting veggies
by brianj555 12/13/2017, 5:28 pm

» Tomato Questions
by sanderson 12/13/2017, 3:04 pm

» Mid-South: December 2017
by AtlantaMarie 12/13/2017, 8:24 am

» What's Up? Yukon gold potatoes!
by sanderson 12/13/2017, 3:15 am

» New Composter - Need Help Filling Correctly
by saganco 12/12/2017, 9:10 pm

» December Avatar: 'Tis The Season!
by sanderson 12/12/2017, 2:29 pm

» The Research Journey:cardboard covering of newly planted seeds
by saganco 12/12/2017, 1:15 pm

» 2017 SFG in Brooks, Ga
by Turan 12/11/2017, 6:39 pm

» What are you eating from your garden today?
by sanderson 12/11/2017, 2:40 pm

» Winter Sowing vs. Winter Growing
by countrynaturals 12/11/2017, 11:44 am

» Mushroom in my lettuce!
by Scorpio Rising 12/10/2017, 10:40 pm

» 5-BOOK BUNDLE GIVEAWAY - ENDS 12/1/17
by No_Such_Reality 12/10/2017, 4:15 pm

» N&C MW; Deep Winter December/January 2017-2018
by Scorpio Rising 12/10/2017, 1:36 pm

» December: What to plant in Northern California and Central Valley areas
by countrynaturals 12/10/2017, 1:24 pm

» WARNING! Please Read! (Especially Grandparents)
by Scorpio Rising 12/9/2017, 8:53 pm

Google

Search SFG Forum

Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  Tuxdad on 3/9/2012, 5:12 pm

OK I've been checking out the local farm stores with their bagged cow manure.. Is that stuff safe to use straight in your garden or not ?? Is it aged or dried as some say it's supposed to be ??

Also on a lighter note... I was able to find the 5 different types of compost that Mel talks about in his book...
avatar
Tuxdad

Posts : 118
Join date : 2012-02-24
Location : South Central Pa

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  walshevak on 3/9/2012, 5:58 pm

The only bagged cow manure I've seen and bought is Black Kow and it is safe in MM and I've top dressed gardens with it in the past. No burning.

Kay

____________________________

A WEED IS A FLOWER GROWING IN THE WRONG PLACE
Elizabeth City, NC
Find more about Weather in Elizabeth City, NC
Click for weather forecast
avatar
walshevak

Certified SFG Instructor

Female Posts : 4362
Join date : 2010-10-17
Age : 74
Location : wilmington, nc zone 8

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  Tuxdad on 3/10/2012, 6:40 am

Greatly appreciated !!Very Happy
avatar
Tuxdad

Posts : 118
Join date : 2012-02-24
Location : South Central Pa

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  camprn on 3/10/2012, 9:27 am

Generally speaking all the bagged compost is considered 'finished' and should be safe to put in the garden and will not harm the plants.

____________________________

41 years a gardener and going strong with SFG.
http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t3574-the-end-of-july-7-weeks-until-frost

There are certain pursuits which, if not wholly poetic and true, do at least suggest a nobler and finer relation to nature than we know. The keeping of bees, for instance. ~ Henry David Thoreau

http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t1306-other-gardening-books



avatar
camprn

Forum Moderator Certified SFG Teacher

Female Posts : 14165
Join date : 2010-03-06
Age : 55
Location : Keene, NH, USA ~ Zone 5a

View user profile http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t3574-the-end-of-july-7-week

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  Tuxdad on 3/11/2012, 7:21 pm

avatar
Tuxdad

Posts : 118
Join date : 2012-02-24
Location : South Central Pa

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  shannon1 on 3/12/2012, 1:48 am

I use it just make sure it says composted cow manure. My mom thinks I'm crazy buying poo.
avatar
shannon1

Posts : 1697
Join date : 2011-04-01
Location : zone 9a St.Johns county FL

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  Lavender Debs on 3/12/2012, 6:28 am

Just to be a party pooper ....I've stopped using bagged cow poo. My favorite nursery guy will not sell it anymore because of the salt content and hormones/antibiotics and various chemicals used by agro business.

I respect him but he is after all, only one voice. When I did use it (mostly as a spring bed and pot tonic with equal parts alfalfa meal and good home grown compost) there was no problem with burning or stink. I do have an observation though, Last year I had total pea failure, same with potted strawberries. My potted strawberries have always been given Lovejoy (the name of the tonic after Seattle Master Gardener Anne Lovejoy who suggested the mix). I gave my 2nd year SFG squares Lovejoy where I planted peas, most of them did not surface. The only square that did was one that did not get Lovejoy. There might be another reason for this. Still waiting for this year’s peas to germinate.
avatar
Lavender Debs

Posts : 2054
Join date : 2010-03-03
Age : 60
Location : Everett, WA USA

View user profile http://songs-of-coming-rain.blogspot.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  Tuxdad on 3/12/2012, 7:04 pm

Well it looks like I'll be hoping for the best since I've already mixed it into my MM..
avatar
Tuxdad

Posts : 118
Join date : 2012-02-24
Location : South Central Pa

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  Unmutual on 3/12/2012, 10:13 pm

@Tuxdad wrote:OK I've been checking out the local farm stores with their bagged cow manure.. Is that stuff safe to use straight in your garden or not ?? Is it aged or dried as some say it's supposed to be ??

Also on a lighter note... I was able to find the 5 different types of compost that Mel talks about in his book...

If it looks and smells like compost(and not cow..poo), then it should be okay. If you put cow..poo into your garden then you're asking for health issues(and not because of everything they inject into cows these days, that's a whole other issue).

Pathogens from uncomposted manure(cow, chicken, humanure, etc.) is the real problem. And the manure has to be composted using a hot method(I think). This is why I only use Black Kow composted manure, and nothing else(well, as far as cow manure goes).

So if that stuff was lumpy and looked like a cow turd rolled in hay, it was probably not a good thing. I'm unsure of the length of time that the garden would have to be fallow following a straight manure addition.

Well then, Cornell University had this to say about manure:

Manures






Animal manures have long been a popular form of organic matter as well as fertilizer for farms and gardens.






Farm manure is still the most readily available manure, purchased
directly or sometimes free from the farm. It is sometimes bagged and
sold in garden centers - with a wide range in its quality, nutritional
content, age, and weed seeds present.






It is not recommended that homeowners use any manure from dogs, cats, or
other meat-eating animals, since there is risk of parasites or disease
organisms that can be transmitted to humans.






Characteristics of animal manures: Farm animal manures provide
NPK - nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). Generally, cow
and horse manures are more readily available than other kinds of animal
manures. For nutrient analysis of manure from eight kinds of farm
animals, as well as other kinds of organic matter, refer to Cornell's
Eco-Gardening Factsheet #8, A Guide to the Nutrient Value of Organic Materials.






Using manure: Manures differ from each other because of their
source, their age, how they were stored (piled, spread, turned over or
not), and the animal bedding material, which may be mixed in. For that
reason it is difficult to provide precise guidance about how long manure
should be aged before use, or how much to use.






Composting is the safest way to make the most of manure's nutritional
potential - if the logistics of making and hauling compost are viable.
For direct use in the garden, first aging manure for 6 months is a good
rule of thumb. Many farmers and gardeners spread fresh manure in the
fall or winter, and till or turn it in at spring planting time.






When manure is spread in the spring, even if aged, it is safest to wait
for at least one month before planting crops, since the microbial
activity it stimulates may interfere with seed germination or plant
growth before that time.






When composted manure is spread directly over the soil, it is helpful to
add about 40 lbs. per 100 square feet, turned into the top 6 to 9
inches. Aged manure is often used in home vegetable gardens as a
side-dressing, or placed directly in holes under the soil where vine
crops such as pumpkins are planted.






Manure tea, made by soaking bags of manure in tubs of water, is a
nutrient-rich liquid that is full of microbial life. It is another way
to use manure as a fertilizer, whether it is poured on the leaves of
plants (called foliar feed) or into the soil.






Problems with manure: While it is one of the most readily
available forms of organic matter and fertilization for many gardeners,
manure can present some problems.






  • The relatively high nitrogen content makes manure extremely
    valuable in composting, where it activates soil bacteria and contributes
    to rapid decomposition of organic matter. But, as a direct soil
    amendment, that same high nitrogen content can be a deficit. Fresh, raw,
    or hot manure activates and builds up soil microbial activity to the
    extent that the nutrients volatilize, or burn up, before plants can use
    them.
  • Fresh manure also can damage plant tissue and kill seedlings. An
    excessive amount of soil nitrogen can pro-duce plants with a high
    nitrate con-tent. These high nitrate levels are not only potentially
    harmful to humans; they also are more attractive to pests than crops
    grown with less nitrogen, and do not store as well either.
  • Manure also is notorious for adding undigested weed seeds to the
    garden, particularly from horses and other animals that eat hay.
    Composting in a hot system (when the pile reaches over 155 degrees F.)
    destroys most weed seeds, but many composting systems are inexact and
    seeds can come through. For that reason, those who use manure usually
    plan on weed-control techniques such as mulching, interplanting (growing
    cover crops between rows), mechanical or hand-weeding, or herbicides in
    some situations.
  • Particularly in agriculture, manure use can pose pollution problems
    when rain or irrigation systems carry nitrogen from the fields before it
    is used by plants. Nitrogen from manure or synthetic fertilizers has
    been identified in New York State as a pollutant found in groundwater.
  • Fresh manure must be used with caution in the garden because it may contain pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella.
    Although the chance of contamination is slim, severe sickness and even
    death may occur if contaminated produce is eaten. To be safe, either
    compost your manure or apply it in the fall after harvest. Wash your
    hands after handling manure and try to leave at least 120 days between
    application of fresh manure and harvest of a crop.

Unmutual

Certified SFG Instructor

Male Posts : 396
Join date : 2011-04-23
Age : 45
Location : Greater New Orleans Area Westbank(Zone 9b)

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Bagged manure ?? Yes or no ?

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum