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Rhubarb Rhubarb

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Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  plantoid on 5/3/2012, 8:47 pm

Rhubarb Rhubarb ,

A few days ago I purchased a packet of rhubarb seeds , on seeing the state of the seeds I thought I'd be lucky if I got six out of the thirty seeds to germinate .

I treated them like my first date at a Valentines dance .

Now can anybody politely tell me what to do with 30 rhubarb plants ...without giving them away or composting the excess

We only have a pocket handkerchief sized garden that has over 2/3 of it under SFG beds , a glasshouse , an office , garage & concreted parking spaces ??
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  JennAndCompany on 5/3/2012, 9:22 pm

plantoid wrote:Rhubarb Rhubarb ,

A few days ago I purchased a packet of rhubarb seeds , on seeing the state of the seeds I thought I'd be lucky if I got six out of the thirty seeds to germinate .

I treated them like my first date at a Valentines dance .

Now can anybody politely tell me what to do with 30 rhubarb plants ...without giving them away or composting the excess

We only have a pocket handkerchief sized garden that has over 2/3 of it under SFG beds , a glasshouse , an office , garage & concreted parking spaces ??

OH MY!!!

Plant strawberries - make pie! In my husband's family, strawberry rhubarb pie (SRP) is a must at every family function!
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  givvmistamps on 5/3/2012, 9:42 pm

@Plantoid: Don't you have a strawberry tower in the yard? (I seem to remember seeing one and think it was you that posted it) Could you put planters of rhubarb near there? Strawberry rhubarb pie is delectable! My cousin used to make a rhubarb upside-down cake when I was little that was delicious, too.

@JennAndCompany: I LOVE strawberry rhubarb pie. A dear, distant cousin used to make it when I was little, and I haven't had any since then...share the recipe??? Maybe I can get my hands on rhubarb sometime when I'm visiting family up north.
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  plantoid on 5/4/2012, 2:28 pm

Thank you peoples,

Yes I do have a strawberry barrel , that strawberry rhubarb pie idea gives us one more recipe the ones we know of.

Now all I have to do is find something to grow the roots in and a space somewhere on the paths , patio or concrete drive way that will be frost free or at least gentle enough not to kill the crowns in winter.

I wonder what four cut in half 45 gallon bright blue plastic barrels will look like out on the front Laughing
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  givvmistamps on 5/4/2012, 3:44 pm

We used to grow our rhubarb next to the detached garage back in Spokane, WA. We got snow and hard, frozen ground, but it always came back every year. I suppose some varieties might be more tender than that, but my cousin always told me rhubarb grew best if it had a good, cold winter. Somebody may have to correct me, since I'm remembering from WAY back when I was around 6-8 years old.
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  JennAndCompany on 5/4/2012, 10:19 pm

I think once rhubarb is established it is a difficult thing to kill (but maybe there are different varieties). I have lived in Minnesota/Wisconsin most of my life and no matter how cold (AND IT GETS COLD) the rhubarb still came up every spring.

@Michelle - I will get the SRP recipe from my mother in law and pass it along to you. Laughing
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  Turan on 5/4/2012, 10:43 pm

Rhubarb pie, rhubard catsup, rhubarb tapioca pudding..... good stuff.

The mark of an abandoned homestead in the mountains of Montana~ a lilac, an apple, and rhubarb and horseradish batches. Sometimes a chimney too.

Rhubarb can handle -40F. There is a rot it gets though, so maybe not so good in soggy places? I have never seen it in a container though. Or for that matter grown from seeds.
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  martha on 5/4/2012, 10:46 pm

Rhubarb - cherry crisp -
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  JennAndCompany on 5/4/2012, 11:11 pm

martha wrote:Rhubarb - cherry crisp -
That sounds tasty!
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  Daniel9999 on 5/4/2012, 11:56 pm

Rhubarb Chutney

2 pounds fresh rhubarb trimmed and cut into 1 inch pieces
1 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
1 cup cider vinegar
1/3 dry red wine
1 medium sized onion finely chopped
1/2 dark raisins
1 tablespoons finely chopped candied or fresh ginger
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon lemon zest
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

Combine the rhubarb, brown sugar, vinegar, wine, onion, raisins, ginger, lemon juice, lemon zest, cinnamon, allspice, and cloves in a heavy non reactive pan. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce heat to medium low and cover and continue cooking until the chutney is thick and rich 30-40 minutes.

Uncover the pan for 10 minutes or and let some of the liquid evaporate stirring occasionally until the chutney reaches the constituency of jam. Let cool to room temperature and transfer to glass jars and refrigerate/freeze.
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  givvmistamps on 5/5/2012, 12:29 am

YUMMY! I can't wait to have strawberry rhubarb pie again!!!

Re: the chutney...is that something that the vinegar cooks out of like the alcohol in wine would? I'm not supposed to have a lot of vinegar -or- red wine, but that chutney recipe looks good!
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  Nicola on 5/5/2012, 12:50 am

I was kind of wondering about harvesting rhubarb. We planted it last year, and knew enough not to pick it the first year. Now this crazy warm spring has the 2 plants flowering! Maybe I can take a picture and post it tomorrow, um, later today.
I just read about this here http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/vegetable/rhubarb-bolting.htm.
I haven't harvested anything yet this year, partly because I'm not sure what I'm supposed to do, or how. Exactly which stalks are to be harvested, the leaves, or stems from 'inside' the plant? Since it has started flowering already, and I've let it go awhile, should I just wait some more and get some seeds?
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  Turan on 5/5/2012, 1:28 am

Nicola wrote:I was kind of wondering about harvesting rhubarb. We planted it last year, and knew enough not to pick it the first year. Now this crazy warm spring has the 2 plants flowering! Maybe I can take a picture and post it tomorrow, um, later today.
I just read about this here http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/vegetable/rhubarb-bolting.htm.
I haven't harvested anything yet this year, partly because I'm not sure what I'm supposed to do, or how. Exactly which stalks are to be harvested, the leaves, or stems from 'inside' the plant? Since it has started flowering already, and I've let it go awhile, should I just wait some more and get some seeds?

I cut the flowering stalks off and discard them. Cut all the leaves with stems thumb thickness (or bigger) off at the ground. Cut off and discard the leafy part. Keep the leaf stems. The stems is what you eat. Cutting it will stimulate more growth. Pencil thin stems means it is not strong enough to be picked, just get rid of the flower stalk so it will keep making leafs to grow the root.
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Rhubarb seeds

Post  tomperrin on 5/12/2012, 9:16 am

Rhubarb from seed takes a long, long time to produce an edible vegetable. I have some started in pots of MM. and they are taking forever to germinate. The Victoria roots I bought and planted this season pushed up stalks within days and look very healthy. I nipped off the seeds in order to promote root growth. I won't harvest the stalks this year, but will next year.

Speaking for my wife and I, one can never have too much rhubarb. Our only limitation before we planted it was the high cost of buying rhubarb over the counter. So now I have ten plants, plus another ten of seeds in pots waiting to germinate. I still have not figured out where I will put the new seedlings, but that decision can be deferred for a year. Rhubarb freezes well, either in their original stalks, or chopped into one inch pieces.

Being hard core rhubarb aficionados, we make our pies without strawberries, but with raw sugar to temper the tartness. Rhubarb is also great made into a syrup for topping vanilla ice cream.

Our source for high quality rhubarb roots (and asparagus as well) is Walker Brothers Jersey Asparagus Farm in Pittstown, NJ. We found them very easy to deal with. We bought our plants online, and then drove down to pick them up. They provided an online discount of 3%. They sell out every year, so if you buy from them, you must place your order in the middle of winter.

Here's their comments on rhubarb from their catalog:



Rhubarb Planting Guide



for the Home Gardener
Rhubarb is a cool season, perennial
plant that is very winter hardy and resistant to drought. Its crop is produced
from crowns consisting of fleshy rhizomes and buds. Following a season of
growth, the rhubarb crown becomes dormant and temperatures below 40-F are
required to stimulate bud break and subsequent growth. Once planted, rhubarb
plantings remain productive for 8 to 15 years. DO NOT EAT RHUBARB LEAVES, THEY
ARE POISONOUS!
SITE SELECTION

Rhubarb tolerates most soils but grows best on fertile,
well-drained soils that are high in organic matter. A clean planting site is
essential for the cultivation of rhubarb since no herbicides are registered for
use on rhubarb.
SITE PREPARATION

Rhubarb is rather tolerant of soil acidity but does
best in slightly to moderately acid soil. The crop can tolerate soil pH as low
as 5.0; however, maximum yields are attained at a pH of 6.0 to 6.8.
PLANTING

Plant rhubarb roots in early spring. Space rhubarb roots 3'
apart in rows and 5'- 6' between rows. Much smaller than this will seriously
crowd the plants and result in a diminished bed and increase the likelihood of
spreading disease. Plant the roots with the crown bud 2 inches below the surface
of the soil. Place plants in the ground with buds pointing up. The hole for the
crown should be dug extra large and composted manure or peat moss can be mixed
with the soil to be placed around the roots. Give the plant 1/4 cup of 5-10-10
worked in to the top 10 inches of soil at planting time. Firm the soil around
the roots but keep it loose over the buds. As the plant starts to grow, remove
the flower/seed stalks as they are seen. Seed stalks restrict the plant's
growth. Rhubarb needs cold to trigger spring growth. Rhubarb tolerates very cold
(-20 F) very well.
FERTILIZER, IRRIGATION & WEED CONTROL

Rhubarb responds well to
fertilizers. The quality of the crop harvested depends to a large extent on the
care and fertilization received. Home gardeners should give each plant 1 cup of
10-10-10 fertilizer each spring, applied in a circle around the plant when
growth starts. Fertilize each year and cultivate shallowly as often as necessary
to remove weeds. Water the crowns after planting and maintain good moisture
throughout the establishment period. Good garden drainage is essential in
growing rhubarb. For home gardeners, planting in raised beds helps ensure
against rotting of the crowns. Small areas of perennial weeds can quickly build
up to serious proportions. To prevent this, all perennial weeds should be killed
the year before planting. The bed should be cultivated (hoeing) in the spring
and after cutting. Rhubarb is relatively free of insect and disease problems.

HARVESTING

Refrain from harvesting rhubarb the first year. Each plant
needs time to build up food reserves in the root to produce thick, robust stems.
See the Chart below for harvesting times:


Year 1 (planted in) DO NOT HARVEST
Year 2
LIGHT HARVEST (few stalks per plant)
Year 3 and on HARVEST for 6 - 8 weeks


When harvesting rhubarb, the first step is to cut the stalks at
the soil line or simply pull them out individually. All of the stalks (1 inch
and larger in diameter) of a plant may be harvested over a 6-8 week period.
After the stalks are cut, the leaves may be removed. Some Fall harvesting is
acceptable. Rhubarb hit by a frost or freeze can still be eaten provided the
stalks are still firm and upright. If the stems appear soft and mushy, do not
eat them. If in doubt about the safety of eating the stalks, don't. Cut those
stalks off and discard them. Allow new stalks to develop before eating.
DIG and DIVIDE

It is normal to reset a bed after 4-5 years. Established
clumps will have to be trimmed every 4 to 5 years or when the stalks get small
and spindly or when the crown is visibly crowded. This will help the plant to
keep growing nice thick stems. This is done by digging around and trimming the
crown down to 4 or 5 buds. You can also use this opportunity to divide your
plant into more plants. You may encounter rot in the crowns from excessive water
in the crown area. If so, destroy these plants.

Walker Brothers can be found at: http://www.walkerplants.com/

Tom
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  GWN on 5/12/2012, 9:48 am

Thank you, that is a very thorough update on Rhubarb.
I got about 6 plants last year from my mothers huge plant.
Planted them in May, and they proceeded to die. They seemed totally dead by August. dead dead.
This year I was totally shocked that they all came up except one, and they had all divided into two or three plants.
They are not growing really much off the ground though, and the stalks are small.
Should I treat them as first years, or second years.
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Rhubarb starts

Post  tomperrin on 5/12/2012, 10:09 am

GWN wrote:Thank you, that is a very thorough update on Rhubarb.
I got about 6 plants last year from my mothers huge plant.
Planted them in May, and they proceeded to die. They seemed totally dead by August. dead dead.
This year I was totally shocked that they all came up except one, and they had all divided into two or three plants.
They are not growing really much off the ground though, and the stalks are small.
Should I treat them as first years, or second years.

I would treat them as first years. The idea is to let the leaves grow in order to develop the root, same as asparagus.

Tom
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  givvmistamps on 5/12/2012, 1:39 pm

tomperrin wrote:

Rhubarb Planting Guide
... Following a season of growth, the rhubarb crown becomes dormant and temperatures below 40-F are required to stimulate bud break and subsequent growth.
Tom

I'm trying to figure this out...if we get temperatures below 40*F periodically, but it doesn't STAY below 40*F for very long (sometimes it drops below 40* at night, then goes back up to 60* during the day), does that mean I can't grow rhubarb down here?
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Breaking dormancy

Post  tomperrin on 5/12/2012, 2:26 pm

My first response is I don't know the answer.
But,
If you can grow garlic and potatoes, which also require a period of cold to break dormancy, then you might be able to grow rhubarb. (I think). Of course, garlic and spuds can be refrigerated. I'm not too sure how you would refrigerate a whole plant, or keep it cold outside. Bear in mind that the leaves and stalks die back, so what you have in the ground are the roots. Thinking out loud, if the temperature drops, I would keep the ground wet on the theory that evaporation would keep the ground cool. So if the temperature drops, wet the ground, then cover with cardboard over sticks or something to create a breeze under the cardboard and over the plants, while keeping the sun off.

Garden center cut rhubarb is costing me $3.99 lb here in NJ. So trying the plants is well worth the effort.

Tom
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all things Rhubarb...

Post  hruten on 5/12/2012, 7:34 pm

I recently went searching for a rhubarb recipe and found this website that has ALL THINGS RHUBARB

http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/

So if you want any information from propogation and growing to recipes for rhubarb wine this is the place. BTW, the deep dish rhubarb strawberry pie was wonderful!!
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  walshevak on 5/12/2012, 8:08 pm

hruten wrote:I recently went searching for a rhubarb recipe and found this website that has ALL THINGS RHUBARB

http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/

So if you want any information from propogation and growing to recipes for rhubarb wine this is the place. BTW, the deep dish rhubarb strawberry pie was wonderful!!

I knew there was a reason I never heard of rhubarb until we moved to Kansas City, MO. from NC. Found this blurb in the above link.

Rhubarb can not be very successfully grown in the southern regions of the United States, although there are exceptions. Rhubarb is a popular garden vegetable in northern areas of the United States but unfortunately will not do well in hot, dry summers of the south. If it survives the heat it will not grow well will produce only thin leaf stalks which are spindly and lack color. Rhubarb will wilt very quickly on hot days (over 90 °F).

It's not the cold, but the heat factor.

Kay

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Best Rhubarb Cake recipe

Post  Nonna.PapaVino on 6/22/2012, 9:07 pm

Recently, we visited a great historical museum in Brownsville, Oregon. Amongst the volumes about Linn County for sale, was one titled "Favorite Rhubarb Recipes." The following caught my eye:



Best Rhubarb Cake Ever



1 cup butter
1 cup sugar
4 large eggs
1 tsp. baking powder

1 cup rhubarb, chopped
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp. salt
Lemon juice
1 cup brown sugar
nuts, if desired
1 or 2 Qts. good whiskey

Before starting, sample whiskey to check for quality. Good, isn’t it? Now go ahead.
Select a large mixing bowl, measuring cups, etc.; check the whiskey again, as it must be just right, not too strong, just right. To assure the whiskey is of the highest quality, pour 1 level cup into a glass and drink it as fast you can. Any burning? No? You’re good to go.
With an electric mixer, beat 1 cup of butter in large fluffy bowl. Add 1 teathpoon of thugar and beat again. Meanwhile, make sure the whiskey is still of the finest quality. (Cry another tup—open second quart if necessary). Add 1 arge legg, 2 c. of Rhubub and beat ‘till it till high. If druit gets stuck in beaters, just pry it loose with a drewscriver. Sample the whishky again, hecking for tonscricisity. Then sift 2 pups of salty or anything at all, it really doesn’t matter.
Sample whishkey agaiin. Sifth 1/2 pint lemon shuice. Fold in chopped butter and strained nuts. Add 1 babblespoon of brown thugar, or whatever color you can find and wix it willy swell. Crease oven and churn da cake pan to three-fifty degwees. Now pour the whiley mess into the coven and ake. Scheck the whishkey again and bo to ged.

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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  walshevak on 6/22/2012, 9:18 pm

lol!
Kay

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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  bluelacedredhead on 6/22/2012, 9:23 pm

givvmistamps wrote:
tomperrin wrote:

Rhubarb Planting Guide
... Following a season of growth, the rhubarb crown becomes dormant and temperatures below 40-F are required to stimulate bud break and subsequent growth.
Tom

I'm trying to figure this out...if we get temperatures below 40*F periodically, but it doesn't STAY below 40*F for very long (sometimes it drops below 40* at night, then goes back up to 60* during the day), does that mean I can't grow rhubarb down here?



No, you can't grow rhubarb as a perennial in the southern states but it can be grown as an annual. Apparently as a new member I can't post external links so the best I can do is suggest you do a browser search for growing rhubarb in Texas Wink
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Re:Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  reservoir on 4/13/2014, 7:43 am

I went to my allotment today and my beautiful rhubarb has what looks like flower stalks.  I never seen anything like this.  Do I leave them on do I remove them and if so is only to dead head the flower or is it the whole stalk that needs to go.  I am so looking forward to strawberry and rhubarb pie and crumble.

Oh and  can rhubarb leaves be put on the compost heap as the are poisonous.  I usually make a tea with the leaves as one of the old timers told me.it helps keep cabbage white fly away.

Christine

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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

Post  johnp on 4/13/2014, 7:58 am

Remove them.
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Re: Rhubarb Rhubarb

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