Square Foot Gardening Forum

Hello Guest!
Welcome to the official Square Foot Gardening Forum.
There's lots to learn here by reading as a guest. However, if you become a member (it's free, ad free and spam-free) you'll have access to our large vermiculite databases, our seed exchange spreadsheets, Mel's Mix calculator, and many more members' pictures in the Gallery. Enjoy.


Display results as :


Rechercher Advanced Search

Latest topics
» test position
by RoOsTeR Today at 1:40 pm

» CANADIAN REGION:What are you doing in October 2016
by Kelejan Today at 9:21 am

» Hello from central Massachusetts!
by Scorpio Rising Yesterday at 10:39 pm

» N&C Midwest: October Happenings!
by Scorpio Rising Yesterday at 10:30 pm

» Northern California & Coastal Valleys - What are you doing this month?
by audrey.jeanne.roberts Yesterday at 9:43 pm

» Microbes...you gotta see this one !!!
by sanderson Yesterday at 9:33 pm

» last chance to pre-order baker seeds-rare seed catalog
by AtlantaMarie Yesterday at 7:36 pm

» Second Year SFG in Canada
by CapeCoddess Yesterday at 7:09 pm

» What's eating my plants
by donnainzone5 Yesterday at 12:30 pm

» Straw Bales with Seeds?
by donnainzone5 Yesterday at 12:26 pm

» Bountea Compost Tea - Got it!!!
by AtlantaMarie Yesterday at 12:25 pm

» Shallots, Prisma
by AtlantaMarie Yesterday at 7:59 am

» Asia Region -Showcase of Gardens - Show Us Yours
by sanderson 10/21/2016, 10:16 pm

» Peas and cucumbers: Trellis position and plant spacing
by yolos 10/21/2016, 8:32 pm

» California's Drought
by Kelejan 10/21/2016, 7:37 pm

» Garlic
by recoush 10/21/2016, 5:15 pm

» Mason bees
by recoush 10/21/2016, 5:08 pm

» Senseless Banter...
by CapeCoddess 10/21/2016, 4:51 pm

» Indian Solar Gardening Calendar
by sanderson 10/21/2016, 3:50 am

» New England October, 2016
by Scorpio Rising 10/20/2016, 8:56 pm

» leggy potatoes plants were started too early in the hous
by Scorpio Rising 10/20/2016, 8:38 pm

» Thin Crust Pizza
by No_Such_Reality 10/19/2016, 11:34 pm

» Our Newest Regional Hosts!
by Scorpio Rising 10/19/2016, 8:10 pm

» November Planting in SoCal, time to keep working it and bragging rights time!
by No_Such_Reality 10/19/2016, 10:27 am

» Winter Hobbies and Crafts
by Scorpio Rising 10/18/2016, 7:48 pm

» Cucumber plant visitor
by Scorpio Rising 10/18/2016, 7:31 pm

» Hello all
by Scorpio Rising 10/18/2016, 7:16 pm

» The Most Annoying Pest In The Yard
by Scorpio Rising 10/18/2016, 6:45 pm

» TrolleyDriver's Compost Thermometer
by sanderson 10/18/2016, 4:32 pm

» 2016 SFG in Brooks, Ga
by yolos 10/18/2016, 11:17 am


Search SFG Forum

Tomato Depth Experiment....

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Tomato Depth Experiment....

Post  quiltbea on 7/2/2012, 3:52 pm

In mid-May I planted four different varieties of tomatoes, two per variety. Some were planted deeper with only the top couple of inches above the ground, and the left ones of the pair was planted shallow, only about one inch deeper than they were in their transplanting pot. Things are pretty consistent for all of them.

As you can see in these I've posted, the pairs are about equal in height today. Some planted shallow produced blossoms earlier while some of those planted deeper did so.

Above: The two on the left are Green Zebras with the furthest left planted shallow. The shallow one is a little taller but the one on the right, transplanted deeper, formed blossoms and fruits first. It was larger at transplant time.

Above are a pair of Pasquebot Romas on the left. Again, about the same height but this time the one planted shallower is producing fruits sooner.

With the Super Marmandes above, it was the one planted shallow that produced flowers and fruits first. In this bed, with much more shade in the mornings, growth isn't thick and heavy but rather sparse. They want more sunshine than this corner gives them.

This last pair are Velvet Reds on the left. The one on the right (planted deeper) is taller, but it was also much larger of the two when it was planted and producing fruits first.

Conclusions to date: Planting depth doesn't matter in the final size of the plant, its the larger seedlings at transplant time that produces the earlier fruits.

If things change in the coming weeks, I'll let you know.


Female Posts : 4613
Join date : 2010-03-21
Age : 74
Location : Southwestern Maine Zone 5A

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Tomato Depth Experiment....

Post  CapeCoddess on 7/2/2012, 8:39 pm

Great experiment & good info, Bea! I love doing stuff like that also. I planted 2 Sweet 100's - 1 layed down and 1 straight in. The diff in the size of the two is amazing, and the layed down has flowers but the other doesn't. Too dark for a photo but I'll try to remember to get one tomorrow.



Posts : 5271
Join date : 2012-05-20
Age : 60
Location : elbow of the Cape, MA, Zone 6b/7a

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Tomato Depth Experiment....

Post  boffer on 7/2/2012, 10:24 pm


Just an idea: We've seen in other threads that tomato roots don't get very big when nutrients and water are easy to get. Is it possible that because you have a good soil medium, that the deep plants aren't doing better because the extra rooting isn't needed for the plant to do its best?

Would the next experiment be to do the same thing only with one batch in good medium, and one batch in not so good medium?

I really don't know if that makes sense or not!


Male Posts : 7392
Join date : 2010-02-26
Age : 63
Location : yelm, wa, usa

View user profile http://boffer.us/

Back to top Go down

Re: Tomato Depth Experiment....

Post  dsfin on 7/2/2012, 10:58 pm


I think that would be another interesting experiment. But if it is nutrients you want to compare it should be one's compost (a component of MM) compared to some other source of nutrient.

Comparing the soil medium would have to be some other comparison. Another trial where all the other conditions were kept the same. Such as MM w/it's compost against regular "dirt" with same compost (for example).

I'm not surprised with Bea's conclusion that the stronger/hardier seedling did better in this trial. When you have extra seedlings than you want to transplant, always go with the stronger/hardier looking ones and cast away the rest.

But then ..... if you've got'em and have the space plant'em anyway.



Male Posts : 51
Join date : 2011-03-10
Age : 59
Location : Milton, WA; PNW - Zone 7-9

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Tomato Depth Experiment....

Post  Sponsored content Today at 1:54 pm

Sponsored content

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum