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Bokashi

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Re: Bokashi

Post  GWN on 3/9/2015, 12:18 pm

Hi there
I have done the bokashi method for a few years, but last year I ran out of the mix and have not made more. I was making the mix in bulk.
I did not mix it with the mels mix, I just buried it in the ground for awhile and then went back and dug it up later and sprinkled on the beds as a second year compost.

It is so great it is SOOO full of worms.  and I liked being able to compost EVERYTHING even meat etc....
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Re: Bokashi

Post  kittykat on 3/24/2015, 9:49 pm

I started doing bokashi composting a couple months ago.  I've never had any success with a regular compost pile or with compost tumblers.  I lost access to the commercial dumpster I was able to use for my mixed garbage, so had to make some drastic changes to how I was dealing with my food waste.  Bokashi is perfect for me. 

As far as using it in the SFG, once it's completely finished composting, my plan is to treat it as regular compost and use it for top-dressing my SFG beds and rejuvenating the squares between crops.  It IS compost - and it DOES use dirt in the composting process, but I'm gonna just go with the fact that it's composted organic material and use it like I said.  And the "tea" that you are able to harvest during the initial breakdown process is supposed to be just awesome on it's on for rejuvenating your garden beds, inviting all those great microbes, organisms and worms to come have a party.  LOL 

The other thing that is great about bokashi is that you can even compost pet waste.  There are different ways of going about that - and you don't want to use the final composted material from pet waste on a garden where you are producing food, but it can be used around the yard to top-dress your other garden areas nicely.  I use the cat litter that's made from newspaper compressed into pellets, so it's a relatively natural substance that should break down and compost, especially using the bokashi and microorganisms in that process to decompose anything nasty in the litter. 

I'm pumped about this.  Still in the process of seeing how it goes, though.  Lots of great info on the web if you're interested in researching.  Very happy to see a few other people interested in it in this my fave gardening forum!
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Re: Bokashi

Post  clarcks on 4/6/2015, 8:00 am

FG, I don't think that was Mel's intention either. Can you think of another medium that I could put in the bucket with the fermented food? What if I put either peat moss or vermiculite? Could I still consider that as "compost" according to Mel's standards? If so, would 
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Build Soil Fertility with Wood Chips, Food Scraps & Bokashi composting. How to make it and table top for SFG.

Post  has55 on 5/24/2015, 6:39 pm

This is an interview with the owner of the Bokashi Bucket. He tells how to make it , if you don't what to buy the product. 

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Bokashi 2

Post  mlpii66 on 4/12/2017, 10:30 pm

@Bart wrote:
TNGeezer wrote:The most economical way to get compost is to make it yourself, using the quick/hot method.
I'd love to be able to make my own compost. Unfortunately, my yard consists mainly of weeds and pine needles. Going all kitchen scraps bring Solder Fly larva. I try adding cardboard, but it doesn't help.
Bart,
I'm looking at trying Bokashi Composting.  A Japanese method using specially blended "brans" that anaerobically processes table scraps.  I'm reading "Bokashi Composting" by  Adam Footer and if it delivers as promised it could be a solution to getting some of your own composting done. Supposed to be able to process dairy, meats and vegetable matter with no odor or harmful bacteria. The bran is a simple wheat bran inoculated with pro-biotics, (yeast, lactic acids) and fermented then blended with the scraps.  The inoculates are commercially available or you can brew your own.  Rice bran, wheat bran and even newspapers have all been used in what I've read so far. 

My ultimate goal is to produce all my own compost as well.
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Re: Bokashi

Post  Banned Member on 4/14/2017, 4:20 pm

I saw an example of this at our state agricultural center a couple years ago.  They had buckets with varying degrees of fermented waste.  They put things in their buckets that cannot go in a standard composter, such as leftover meat scraps and chicken bones.

I passed on buying one, because you had to continually purchase their powder to make the thing work.  It took more than twice as long to make compost, and the finished product while possibly more nutritious would not have been enough to feed our plants even one time.

It is worth looking into, but if it were me, I would buy a couple of 32-gallon plastic garbage cans and make quick, hot compost using any of the hot methods that will give you a cubic yard of finished compost in 10-21 days.

Even if you do not have grass clippings, you can use kitchen waste and possibly find a retailer that has fruit and veggie scraps, like a raw juicer or a restaurant or even Whole Paycheck or similar stores.

I was in the right place at the right time a couple years ago, when the person that normally picks up all the pulp from Whole Foods was unable to come pick up his bag.  I took that bag and brought it home, and it added a good foot of space in the then developing compost pile.  I was also lucky one other time, when a nutritional rep had some alfalfa powder that was about to go past its date, so she gave me three large jars.  That heated up our compost pile as successfully as dried blood or other nitrogen products.

I am confident you can make ample supplies of your own compost, even if you live in an apartment in NYC and have to compost on your roof.  It may take longer to fill up a can, but eventually you will, and you will also have motivation to eat more fruits and vegetables to have more waste.

You can do it

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Re: Bokashi

Post  has55 on 4/14/2017, 5:15 pm

TNGeezer wrote:I saw an example of this at our state agricultural center a couple years ago.  They had buckets with varying degrees of fermented waste.  They put things in their buckets that cannot go in a standard composter, such as leftover meat scraps and chicken bones.

I passed on buying one, because you had to continually purchase their powder to make the thing work.  It took more than twice as long to make compost, and the finished product while possibly more nutritious would not have been enough to feed our plants even one time.

It is worth looking into, but if it were me, I would buy a couple of 32-gallon plastic garbage cans and make quick, hot compost using any of the hot methods that will give you a cubic yard of finished compost in 10-21 days.

Even if you do not have grass clippings, you can use kitchen waste and possibly find a retailer that has fruit and veggie scraps, like a raw juicer or a restaurant or even Whole Paycheck or similar stores.

I was in the right place at the right time a couple years ago, when the person that normally picks up all the pulp from Whole Foods was unable to come pick up his bag.  I took that bag and brought it home, and it added a good foot of space in the then developing compost pile.  I was also lucky one other time, when a nutritional rep had some alfalfa powder that was about to go past its date, so she gave me three large jars.  That heated up our compost pile as successfully as dried blood or other nitrogen products.

I am confident you can make ample supplies of your own compost, even if you live in an apartment in NYC and have to compost on your roof.  It may take longer to fill up a can, but eventually you will, and you will also have motivation to eat more fruits and vegetables to have more waste.

You can do it
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Re: Bokashi

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