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transplanting sensitive plants

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transplanting sensitive plants

Post  jarity on 12/25/2014, 4:34 pm

hello,
i hope i am in the correct section. If not i think i can get away with saying MERRY XMAS!
my question is..and i have done quite a bit of homework(google).. and am confused.
i have a list of plants that are not easily transplantable( sp). does this hold if they R planted in bio degradable pots under lights and then set out?

ps, my book(sq. ft.) came in but i have not picked it up as of yet.
also the square ft. book should not be allowed to be available till after the last frost!!
i am sitting here(xmas) trying to figure out how to plant this feb (under hoop house)zone 6a!! and U have snow falling all around the pages!!
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  AtlantaMarie on 12/25/2014, 5:32 pm

Hi Jarity.  I think you're fine.  Camprn or Sanderson will move it to the proper place if it's not.

Merry Christmas back at you!  Wink

I'm guessing you're talking about carrots, beans, corn, etc?  No, even if they're in bio pots, it's better to directly put them in the garden.

Can you give us some examples from your list?  That will help us help you better.

Thanks.
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  CapeCoddess on 12/25/2014, 5:33 pm

Sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't. Take squash and cucumber plants for instance - I can start them inside and sometimes they transferred out just fine but most of the time they died after transplanting. I've learned to plant those seeds directly in the garden. Which seedlings are you interested in transplanting?

CC
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  quiltbea on 12/25/2014, 7:26 pm

Some seeds say direct seed for a reason.  They are either too sensitive if transplanted or they really prefer outdoor seeding.
I started some sugar snap peas indoors, under lights, as a test.  I wanted to get an earlier start on my peas.  Transplanted those then direct seeded in the soil outdoors.  The direct seeded plants caught up with the transplanted ones in a couple weeks......so why bother to go to all that trouble of starting indoors where you're wasting time, space, pots, attention and starting soil.
Its better to direct seed outdoors and give them a little weather protection, like plastic or row cover to give them an earlier boost, in my humble opinion.
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  camprn on 12/25/2014, 9:16 pm

Jarity I would suspect, even with a hoop over beds, you won't be planting any thing outside until April.

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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  jarity on 12/28/2014, 3:09 pm

AtlantaMarie wrote:Hi Jarity.  I think you're fine.  Camprn or Sanderson will move it to the proper place if it's not.

Merry Christmas back at you!  Wink

I'm guessing you're talking about carrots, beans, corn, etc?  No, even if they're in bio pots, it's better to directly put them in the garden.

Can you give us some examples from your list?  That will help us help you better.

Thanks.
snow peas , Mizuna, mache, Spring Raab Broccoli and Olympia Spinach
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have i naugh to gain?

Post  jarity on 12/28/2014, 3:46 pm

seems as if some R saying that planting indoors is to no avail as the in-ground planted seeds at a later date will catch up and surpass the indoor transplanted seedlings?
oh one more question.... can i plant 1 snow pea bush (Dwarf Grey Sugar) in each sq. ft. of space (using 2 spaces=2 bushes) as in the square ft gardening book? 
or am i better off growing a normal climbing variety in 1 space? my hoop house is 3' high and i wonder if it is possible to prune the climbers to that height rather than go with with the dwarf? am i saving space with the dwarfs?

one more question please.. is there ANY hardy vegetables that will continue 2 grow thru the short days (long nites)of winter?

thanx for everyone giving me a hand here!!
and sorry about the numerous questions but i am anxious to finish ordering my seeds now and i am excited and am ordering all too much. i was not aware that there were varieties and it's hard to eliminate any. 4 x 8 ft garden.
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  quiltbea on 12/28/2014, 4:12 pm

I don't waste time starting seeds indoors if the package states to direct-seed outdoors where most till catch up to those pampered indoors which didn't die from transplant shock. 

I can't help with the climbing sugar pea vines questions.  Mine grow over 6 ft vines and they are all from individual seeds, not a bush.  I think I've seen in some catalogs a variety that has much shorter vines so you might try those.  But they aren't a bush.  They are individual seeds that vine upward.


On the question about plants thru the winter.  There are plants that will not fully die in the winter and come back in the spring that you might want to try.
I have a curled parsley that lived outdoors in its pot thru ice and snow and temps down into the 20sF at nite and was still green.  I recently brought it into the house so I could keep it safe from our long, grueling winter here in Maine.
Some perennial herbs come back; rosemary, common and German thymes, Greek oregano, sage, parsley and chives.  I'm in zone 5 and their roots live thru the winter and start growing again in spring.  They should all do well for you.
As for the greens you mentioned, you can start those directly outdoors many weeks before your last freeze in spring but cover them with a hoop house and later start them outdoors in the fall where they will grow many weeks after your first freeze with a bit of help from a hoop covering. 

A hoop house doesn't have to be elaborate.  Just some wire coat hangers bent in arcs with plastic pinned to them with spring clothes pins or spring clips will work.  There are many types of season extenders featured on this forum.  Just type 'hoop house' in the Search Box upper left and read and see pictures.  Lots of help there.  

The best thing for you to do, is try what you like to eat and see how it works for you.  Every garden has its own particular micro climate and is different from its nearby neighbor so you won't know til you try them.

Good luck.
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  quiltbea on 12/28/2014, 4:15 pm

jarity, I just checked my Johnnyseeds.com catalog and they have Sugar Ann and Sugar Sprint which are sugar peas that have vines only 2 to 2 1/2 ft tall.  Sounds like what you'd need.
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  AtlantaMarie on 12/28/2014, 7:01 pm

Jarity - DON'T apologize for asking questions!!  How else are you going to learn?  (And remember, it's ALL a learning process...) 

We all order too much, lol. Laughing   That's half the fun!  It also gives you options to try different things.  (That's my story & I'm sticking to it, says the woman who spent $90 just for seeds at Baker Creek last summer.  On top of what I already had...)

I don't think any of us are saying that you shouldn't start plants indoors.  Most of MY plants wouldn't make it if I didn't start them inside.  What we're saying is to read your package carefully.  It will tell you if you can start them inside or if they should be directly sowed into the garden.

I have a spreadsheet that I'll be glad to email you (and anyone else) if you'd like it.  It's got all of the seeds I have on-hand.  One of the things I address is direct planting vs. starting indoors & then transplanting.  Just email or PM me if you'd like a copy.

Also the All New SFG book has good info on what can be started indoors.

As far as hardy veggies that make it thru the dark days in Chicago - maybe kale?  Cabbage & broccoli are cold lovers.  But I don't know about planting in that area!  Anyone?  Anyone?  Quiltbea had some good suggestions!

Keep us informed!!!! you rock
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  sanderson on 12/28/2014, 8:10 pm

Jarity,

Bush beans and peas = 9 per square.  Vining / pole peas and beans = 8 per square (2 rows with 4 in each row)  Bush peas and beans will flop over a bit into the adjoining squares if you don't have a small cage/fence around their area.

As far as growing in the "dark solstice days," plants need a minimum number of sun hours per day to actually grow = get taller.  They may be green and alive, like my snow peas, cabbage, kale, chard, onions, etc. are green and alive right now, but they don't make any progress during my lower-latitude, few short days.

Direct seeding:  Direct seed anything that is grown for it's roots such as carrots and parsnips.  Can they be transplanted?  Yes, but it is painstaking work, not worth the effort.  As you get more experience and learn about your weather, you will know what you want to start indoors in the cold spring and what you want to wait until the soil is warm enough to direct sow outdoors.  Example, I start my bean seeds indoors in the cold spring, but direct sow for the second crop late summer.

I think most of us start seedlings indoors in the cold spring because we like to tend to the baby green seedlings.  Then when all the other city slickers (opps, I'm a city slicker) are rushing to Home Depot late spring for their pony packs and little pots of veggies and herbs, we have our own seedlings growing at home.

Also type in "greenhouse" in the search box.  You may eventually want to place a taller PVC and plastic greenhouse directly over one or both easy-to-reach ends of the 4 x 8 bed.  I have remove-and-store gable roofed PVC frames over each of my small boxes for either 4 mil plastic winter covers or tulle fabric summer insect protection or heavy sheers scorching hot sun protection.

Don't hold back on your questions, okay? Very Happy
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Re: transplanting sensitive plants

Post  AtlantaMarie on 12/28/2014, 10:43 pm

sanderson wrote:
I think most of us start seedlings indoors in the cold spring because we like to tend to the baby green seedlings.  Then when all the other city slickers (opps, I'm a city slicker) are rushing to Home Depot late spring for their pony packs and little pots of veggies and herbs, we have our own seedlings growing at home.

Don't hold back on your questions, okay? Very Happy
+1 to both items!
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