Square Foot Gardening Forum
[table bgcolor=#000000 height=275][tr][td]

Hello Guest!
Welcome to the official Square Foot Gardening Forum.
There's lots to learn here by reading as a guest. However, if you become a member (it's free, ad free and spam-free) you'll have access to our large vermiculite databases, our seed exchange spreadsheets, Mel's Mix calculator, and many more members' pictures in the Gallery. Enjoy.


[/td][/tr][/table]
Search
 
 

Display results as :
 

 


Rechercher Advanced Search

Latest topics
» Coffee Substitute?
by countrynaturals Today at 11:08 am

» Using city water, how does your comsumption increase
by countrynaturals Today at 11:05 am

» Howdy, from Central Florida
by AtlantaMarie Today at 9:26 am

» Biochar?
by SQWIB Today at 8:18 am

» My Compost Bin
by SQWIB Today at 8:09 am

» How's the Weather Where You're At?
by sanderson Today at 3:42 am

» Tomato Questions
by sanderson Today at 3:32 am

» A really, really Frugal Gardener
by sanderson Today at 3:30 am

» Today's Harvest
by sanderson Today at 3:27 am

» Worm bin?
by sanderson Today at 3:24 am

» Compost pit?
by No_Such_Reality Today at 12:05 am

» CANADIAN REGION: What are you doing in October 2017
by Mimi2 Yesterday at 7:33 pm

» N & C Midwest: October 2017!
by Scorpio Rising Yesterday at 7:20 pm

» BOOK GIVEAWAY - ENDS 10/20/17
by brianj555 Yesterday at 11:20 am

» Northern California & Coastal Valleys - What are you doing this month?
by countrynaturals Yesterday at 10:55 am

» Sowing Experiment! Anyone Tried This?
by brianj555 Yesterday at 10:36 am

» Spaghetti Squash ?
by countrynaturals Yesterday at 10:28 am

» Third Year SFG in Canada
by trolleydriver 10/21/2017, 5:34 pm

» 2017 SFG in Brooks, Ga
by yolos 10/21/2017, 5:16 pm

» Frames for SFG Beds - Versitile PVC frames for Protection
by sanderson 10/21/2017, 4:10 pm

» California's Drought
by AtlantaMarie 10/21/2017, 10:04 am

» Hello from a 7b zone
by AtlantaMarie 10/21/2017, 10:00 am

» Newbie from Ayrshire, West Coast of Scotland
by plantoid 10/21/2017, 7:27 am

» Butterfly Junction
by sanderson 10/21/2017, 12:08 am

» Mels book
by sanderson 10/20/2017, 11:54 pm

» Any Strange and Wonderful Visitors? Photos please!
by countrynaturals 10/20/2017, 11:34 am

» What are you eating from your garden today?
by sanderson 10/20/2017, 3:38 am

» A great offer for a local SFG,er
by sanderson 10/20/2017, 3:07 am

» Hello from Gilbert, AZ
by LizDTM 10/20/2017, 12:21 am

» How to Grow Better Tomatoes
by countrynaturals 10/19/2017, 7:59 pm

Google

Search SFG Forum

has55's R & D Journey

Page 3 of 5 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 10/4/2016, 8:21 am

Sanderson, I'm not sure how that defies work? I was going to keep it simple, just moves things around, use my finger to makes holes and plant, like I do now in SFG. I really what to see how it affect the insect pest. I try to plant plants of similarity in different squares and away from each other, but some are still close, because there so many in the same family , like greens and brassica. I going to using my garlic, onions and oregano around them to see how that works. That will be one of my seed mixed. also I going to sprinkle  mustard seedling later after the plants are larger. I will be cutting all plants to the ground and leave the  roots in. this is for my active beds. I might try some oats, since it will winter kill.
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  sanderson on 10/4/2016, 1:39 pm

I misunderstood.

____________________________

Find more about Weather in Fresno, CA
Click for weather forecast
avatar
sanderson

Forum Moderator Certified SFG Teacher

Female Posts : 14797
Join date : 2013-04-21
Age : 68
Location : Fresno CA Zone 8-9

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 10/4/2016, 9:55 pm

sanderson wrote:I misunderstood.
Sanderson, I'm not sure how that defies work?   
i guess I was sleepy, when i wrote that response, poor proof read.. remember , i work nights. i thought i wrote , I'm not sure how the thing or machine work, not how it defies work. didn't catch that. sorry.
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  sanderson on 10/4/2016, 11:01 pm

Ah, elusive sleep

____________________________

Find more about Weather in Fresno, CA
Click for weather forecast
avatar
sanderson

Forum Moderator Certified SFG Teacher

Female Posts : 14797
Join date : 2013-04-21
Age : 68
Location : Fresno CA Zone 8-9

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 10/7/2016, 5:04 pm

sanderson wrote:Ah, elusive sleep
yes, the elusive sleep. I can see it now, almost within my reach,zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 10/18/2016, 12:06 am







avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 10/28/2016, 4:42 pm

Hi Dallas-Ft. Worth. Today, my wife came to me after she had harvested the greens for her family members and us, stating that the colors of the leaves were very intense and deeper than anything we've have every grown. That's was from the addition of the micro-dynamix. Sorry no pictures,but Heather got the  fungi/bacteria ratio right. I'm personally working on getting it right at home per Dr. Elaine Ingham response to my soil test that I posted in another thread.
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

has55's R & D Journey;How To Get Rid of Subterranean Termites For Good Without Pesticides

Post  has55 on 11/4/2016, 6:14 pm




avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 11/6/2016, 8:22 pm

Sanderson, didn't you mentioned that your area have aggressive termites that was eating your SFG's beds. I believe you showed us a picture of a partially destroyed bed. Do you think this guy idea will work for you?
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  sanderson on 11/7/2016, 3:14 am

I watched both videos. Boric acid and an antibiotic in a water solution and soak the cardboard. Adding the antibiotic makes sense because it kills the gut organisms that do the actual breakdown of the wood the termites eat. I don't know about the boric acid, what else does it kill? I would NOT spray the wood beds. However, outside the box, these could be good for monitoring termite activity. All my beds are off the ground now so termites are not a problem for the SFG garden.

When we had termites in 2 exterior walls, the pest control company soaked the perimeter dirt and drilled holes in concrete aprons like the patio and front drive to pressure inject pesticide. They also installed "bait stations" that they monitored on a quarterly basis. When I found out that the bait was just plain pine, we quit the service. We thought they were treated blocks that would kill termites. So, that said, making a couple of tubes as a test would be interesting to try. I now have all bare dirt covered with wood chips, carefully pulled away from the house foundation. If I try the experiment, I will post.

____________________________

Find more about Weather in Fresno, CA
Click for weather forecast
avatar
sanderson

Forum Moderator Certified SFG Teacher

Female Posts : 14797
Join date : 2013-04-21
Age : 68
Location : Fresno CA Zone 8-9

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 11/7/2016, 7:21 am

sanderson wrote:I watched both videos.  Boric acid and an antibiotic in a water solution and soak the cardboard.  Adding the antibiotic makes sense because it kills the gut organisms that do the actual breakdown of the wood the termites eat.  I don't know about the boric acid, what else does it kill?  I would NOT spray the wood beds.  However, outside the box, these could be good for monitoring termite activity.  All my beds are off the ground now so termites are not a problem for the SFG garden.

When we had termites in 2 exterior walls, the pest control company soaked the perimeter dirt and drilled holes in concrete aprons like the patio and front drive to pressure inject pesticide.  They also installed "bait stations" that they monitored on a quarterly basis.  When I found out that the bait was just plain pine, we quit the service.  We thought they were treated blocks that would kill termites.  So, that said,  making a couple of tubes as a test would be interesting to try.  I now have all bare dirt covered with wood chips, carefully pulled away from the house foundation.  If I try the experiment, I will post.
I pulled the chips away from the house too. I don't have issues with leaves. this is what dirt doctor says about termites and boric acid:


Feeding Habits: Feed on wood, paper, and other wood products; fungi; dried plant and animal products. Termites sometimes eat growing plants. They use intestinal protozoans to digest chewed food.
Economic Importance: Destroy wood structures.
Natural Control: Beneficial nematodes.
Organic Control: Boric acid products applied to bare wood, beneficial fungi products, plant oil products, and sand barriers (see below), especially in openings for plumbing in slabs.
Insight: It isn't necessary to use toxic chemicals to treat your home or office for termites. Here's a safer and more effective approach.
 Treat all exposed wood with boric acid products such as Tim-Bor or Bora-Care or hot pepper spray. Inject these same products by foam into the walls. Dust natural DE and boric acid into wall cavities. Use 00 sandblasting sand (also sold as 16 grit sand) as a physical barrier in leave-outs in slabs, against the edge of slabs and around piers and beams. New construction can use it under slabs. Treat the soil around the structure with beneficial nematodes. Ignore the nuts that say to remove the mulch from around the house.

   The first step is to eliminate wet and moist wood from the house or other affected structures. Subterranean termites don't like dry wood. Check carefully for leaks of all kinds and have them fixed. Installing drainage systems around structures is sometimes necessary.

     Sand will make an effective termite barrier. Not just any sand will work--you must use a 16-grit sand (also sold as 00 sandblasting sand) to create the barrier. It’s the size and uniformity that’s important. The material can be sharp sand or washed silicon sand, basalt or lava. Termites can't get through it. Put the sand on each side of the foundation beam of the structure. The sand prevents the insects from building the earthen tubes up to the wooden parts of the house. A trench or wedge of sand above the ground measuring 6 inches by 6 inches (or smaller) and filled with sand can be effective. The trench should run around the entire perimeter of the structure. 
     Treat exposed wood with boric acid products. These materials soak into the wood and give long-lasting protection. This works well for new construction, remodeling, and pier and beam construction.
Ok this is enough to wet your appetite for more info If you want it. Go here- TERMITE
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 2/8/2017, 11:21 am

has anyone in the super hot areas like California, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, etc... or has a temp in the 90's above with moderate humity. like Georgia ( we use air conditioners for cooling) has had success with summer greens. If so, please post. 
I found several great listing, but I rather hear from those who actually grew them and the pros and cons. Example, I won't grow purslane anymore. Love, love, the flavor, but is an aggressive weed that has seed pods which explode up to 6ft.


Last edited by camprn on 5/1/2017, 10:29 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : corrected title)
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  RoOsTeR on 2/8/2017, 11:45 am

has55 wrote:has anyone in the super hot areas like California, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, etc... or has a temp in the 90's above with moderate humity. like Georgia ( we use air conditioners for cooling) has had success with summer greens. If so, please post. 
I found several great listing, but I rather hear from those who actually grew them and the pros and cons. Example, I won't grow purslane anymore. Love, love, the flavor, but is an aggressive weed that has seed pods which explode up to 6ft.

I'm mobile currently, but there are many, many threads here on the forums discussing square foot gardening in hot, desert like conditions. Check the regional forums.

____________________________


I am my gardens worst enemy.
avatar
RoOsTeR

Forum Administrator

Male Posts : 4316
Join date : 2011-10-04
Location : Colorado Front Range

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 2/8/2017, 12:28 pm

that was my first step. That was a No go on summer greens. they seem to bury within the threads and too time consuming for someone who still works 12-16 hrs days. If anyone has anything to share or can point to a page within a thread that would be helpful. Thanks.
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  herblover on 2/8/2017, 1:02 pm

I have grown a lettuce variety called 'Scottsdale' which has done well in my summer garden.  I have only found it through Seeds of Change to order.  Our summer weather is typically hot and humid; we do have 90+ degree days but not quite like the deep south.
avatar
herblover

Female Posts : 577
Join date : 2010-03-27
Age : 55
Location : Central OH

View user profile

Back to top Go down

has55's R&D: Journey; summer greens

Post  newbeone on 2/8/2017, 1:14 pm

As we speak it's 87 F. And I have Chard, Lacinato Kale, Arugula, Parsley, my Cilantro is going to seed but it has nice flowers, they were planted for winter garden but are doing good so far Average Temperature last three days was 85 F.
avatar
newbeone

Male Posts : 173
Join date : 2016-09-18
Age : 76
Location : San Antonio, Tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 2/9/2017, 5:08 pm

newbeone wrote:As we speak it's 87 F. And I have Chard, Lacinato Kale, Arugula, Parsley, my Cilantro is going to seed but it has nice flowers, they were planted for winter garden but are doing good so far Average Temperature last three days was 85 F.
Thank you for your replies. I need to clarify. I'm looking at greens that will grow in June, July, and August. Has anyone had success and if there are con's not to do it. I will not grow purslane because it quickly becomes a weed. I put the parameters in the initial posting. 
Newbeone, you live down the street from me ( 5 hrs away with similar temps.) Have you grown any greens successfully in these months?

  • I had success with collard, mustard, Malabar spinach and swiss chard. don't know about the Tuscan black palm kale, amaranth, orach, lamb quarters and dandelion. 
  • I did not do well with beet green in our summer heat.


  • I found three sites. 

SUMMER-LOVIN’ SALAD GREENS

Top six summer greens to grow in your garden
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  camprn on 2/9/2017, 7:46 pm

Gardening is regional and seasonal. The best advice you can get would be from your local county cooperative extension service.

____________________________

41 years a gardener and going strong with SFG.
http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t3574-the-end-of-july-7-weeks-until-frost

There are certain pursuits which, if not wholly poetic and true, do at least suggest a nobler and finer relation to nature than we know. The keeping of bees, for instance. ~ Henry David Thoreau

http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t1306-other-gardening-books



avatar
camprn

Forum Moderator Certified SFG Teacher

Female Posts : 14165
Join date : 2010-03-06
Age : 55
Location : Keene, NH, USA ~ Zone 5a

View user profile http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t3574-the-end-of-july-7-week

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 2/9/2017, 11:08 pm

Gardening is regional and seasonal.- you're correct Very Happy
The best advice you can get would be from your local county cooperative extension service.-you're correct Very Happy
They have been my safety net since the eighties as a gardener, in the 90's when I was an organic farmer and to the present. I used to do public tv shows on gardening, but it was backyard field gardening with my troy bilt tiller. The agents are invaluable. I highly recommend everyone to use them. Our tax dollar is being put to good use. Organic is more acceptable now, but it was an uphill battle back in the 80's and nineties. I felt I was alone and being intimidated to be quiet. It was like when a person was involved in alternative health, they were called a health nut. Now it's mainstream. The same with organics. I would ask the store to carry organics, but it fell on death ears. But as new data came out thru the internet, it is strongly becoming part of mainstream choices in gardening.

My challenge is they don't really address what I call out of the box crops. Thier answers are vague and I respect that. They don't know. They give suggestion to what the average gardener that would not grow thru the summer or thru the winter with a greenhouse or covered low hoop house. I understand that.   So we get only a select group of plants. the link below shows this. See below.
Recommended Vegetable Cultivars For North Central Texas

I grow these plants, but I know I can do better, save more money on food cost and improve my health. But I have to research and not stop at what people call  " we always did it that way." thought. That's what Mel help me do.  So many changes have occurred in seeds and plants, that I would like to take advantage of the blessing, thus be proactive.  Such as Malabar spinach and Swiss chard that easily handles North texas hot weather, but they are not on the list. I would not have known about Malabar Spinach if GloriaG had not share her experience with me.  
We have over 29,000 Registered members. That's why I reaching out to anyone who might have had any experience and is willing to share on our wonderful forum.
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 2/10/2017, 11:29 pm

Ok, found out from some local gardeners amaranth grows quite well here, but it also an aggressive weed for my area. No one knows about the other plants, except sweet potatoes leaves. So I will add it to the list. Summer greens for this year will be sweet potatoes, Malabar spinach, swiss chard, and arugula. Still looking for two more for my area. I'm avoiding purslane and lamb quarter.
I also found out that we have a flowering type of purslane that isn't a weed but will bring tons of bees to the area.  So I'm going to try that also., but keep in containers, just in case it is a naughty, naughty weed.

Sanderson, you once put up a picture showing you growing plants under a shade cloth that you were able to walk under. do you recall what the shading ratio of that cloth is? 
What types of plants were you growing under that plant? You told us, but I can't recall.
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  RoOsTeR on 2/11/2017, 10:49 am

http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t20714-heat-wave-and-shade-screen?highlight=shade+cloth

http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t19139-shade-cloth-question?highlight=shade+cloth

http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t16860-shade-cloth-for-summer-lettuce?highlight=shade+cloth

http://squarefoot.creatingforum.com/t15962-shade-fabric?highlight=shade+cloth


I may not get the extreme high summer temps that some experience, but our summers do hit 90+ regularly, and the Colorado front range is more or less an arid, desert like environment with blazing sun.

I've had great luck growing many types of lettuces and spinach in planter type boxes filled with Mels Mix, and placed in shaded areas (like my front and back porch). They receive late evening or early morning sun, and shade through the hottest parts of the day. These boxes are easily misted and watered by anyone around the house during the day if need be. I succession plant and overseed and don't cut, but just harvest while still young and not bitter. I try to find heat tolerant blends.
With adequate water and a bit of shade, I haven't had any problems harvesting beet greens during the summer. I try to plant them around things that will provide a little shade. They can get 'wilty' during the heat of the day, but they are fine mornings and evening. I'm not a beet fan, but I do like the greens. I keep what I want of the beets to ferment, and give the rest away.
The greens are mine tongue

I do mustard greens, but usually only get one harvest out of them before they go to seed. I haven't had much luck keeping them going no matter where I plant them. Same with cilantro.

Shard, I can grow all summer just about anywhere.

Someday, I'd like to try some Malabar spinach myself. Like a Star @ heaven

____________________________


I am my gardens worst enemy.
avatar
RoOsTeR

Forum Administrator

Male Posts : 4316
Join date : 2011-10-04
Location : Colorado Front Range

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  donnainzone5 on 2/11/2017, 11:39 am

Mottistone is a heat-tolerant lettuce variety.  Also, there are heat-wave lettuce blends available.

I don't know how much heat they actually can handle.
avatar
donnainzone5

Certified SFG Instructor

Female Posts : 2167
Join date : 2010-03-02
Age : 70
Location : Bend, OR (Zone 5-6)

View user profile http://www.amway.com/DonnaKBecker

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  has55 on 2/11/2017, 2:58 pm

thanks, everyone. I look into those links RoOster. during break tonight. I  re-research again last night on the forum but wasn't finding what I wanted. Well appreciated for the links.
avatar
has55

Posts : 1666
Join date : 2012-05-10
Location : Denton, tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

RE: has55 R&D Journey; summer greens

Post  newbeone on 2/11/2017, 4:10 pm

Sorry has55 I'm an implant from zone 4, this summer will be my second summer down here. Last June, July and August my garden was looking pretty bad as far as greens the mustard got so hot you couldn't eat it even cooked, I tried Malabar spinach but I planted it in the only spot I have a little shade, needless to say it do very good either. This will be my first year with new beds full of MM. and I have rigged shade over two beds that I can adjust the height I'll let You know how I make out this summer.
avatar
newbeone

Male Posts : 173
Join date : 2016-09-18
Age : 76
Location : San Antonio, Tx

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  sanderson on 2/11/2017, 4:42 pm

has55 wrote:Ok, found out from some local gardeners amaranth grows quite well here, but it also an aggressive weed for my area.
Dstack sent me some Molten Fire amaranth seeds last spring.  The one trial plant was beautiful and survived the hot temps.  I let it fall over the side so any seeds won't affect the SFG beds.  I have some pink variety in the front yard and it reseeds itself.  It is easy to thin so I don't consider it invasive.

Sanderson, you once put up a picture showing you growing plants under a shade cloth that you were able to walk under. do you recall what the shading ratio of that cloth is? 
What types of plants were you growing under that plant? You told us, but I can't recall.
The cloth is 75% blocking, purchased at Home Depot.  The plants receive some morning sun and are under the shade not later than noon-ish.  Everything that I grow in the middle and late summer is shaded: tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, winter squash, cucumbers, cantaloupe, beans, and herbs.  


The only thing that I forgot to shade was New Zealand spinach.  I swear it is a miracle plant, surviving mild freeze and hot summers.  Pluck a few leaves or cut back some stems for harvesting.  It's about 21 months old now.  I wanted to try Malabar spinach but I'm glad the NZ was the one that sprouted!  NZ spreads like a ground cover, so if you try it, plant in it's own container or near the edge of the bed.  For salad this summer, I am going to try the "4 season" variety.

Rooster,  My spring cilantro likes to bolt fast so I have to harvest quickly and dehydrate for winter cooking.  But, the pollinators love the flowers.  Wink I planted both cilantro and parsley last fall and they did great this winter.  I'm going to try mustard for the seeds this spring/summer, so the quick bolting is good news for my purposes.

____________________________

Find more about Weather in Fresno, CA
Click for weather forecast
avatar
sanderson

Forum Moderator Certified SFG Teacher

Female Posts : 14797
Join date : 2013-04-21
Age : 68
Location : Fresno CA Zone 8-9

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: has55's R & D Journey

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 3 of 5 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum