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Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

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Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  ander217 on 11/23/2010, 7:59 am

No one made pumpkin pie like my grandma. She used to raise a special kind of pumpkin and cook it down for hours to get the right texture for her pies, but I make do with canned pumpkin. I like to use the organic canned pumpkin from Whole Foods which my daughter brings to me.

2 eggs
2/3 c. sugar
1 Tbsp melted butter
1 Tbsp. flour
1 can pumpkin
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. cloves
1/4 tsp. allspice
1/4 tsp. ginger
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. sorghum molasses (substitute cane molasses if sorghum can't be found)
1 tsp. vanilla

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Prepare an uncooked piecrust and place in pieplate. (Pastry recipe follows.) I use a standard 9" or 10" pieplate - if using the 9" there will be a little filling left over for a "baby pie" for the little ones.

Using a mixer, beat eggs until light and frothy. Add sugar and beat well. Beat in remaining ingredients. Pour into prepared piecrust. (If desired, place strips of foil around edge of crust to keep from getting too dark while baking.)

Place pie in oven, and cook for ten minutes, then turn oven temp down to 350 degrees.

Bake an additional 30-45 minutes, or until filling is completely set and cooked through in the middle. Cool and serve with whipped cream.

(I make whipped cream in my Magic Bullet. I fill the larger container 2/3 full of whipping cream, add a couple of spoonfuls of sugar, 1/2 tsp. vanilla and whip it several seconds until thick. Don't overwhip or you'll make butter.)

Here is the pastry recipe I usually use.

Dice 1 1/2 sticks of unsalted butter and return to 'fridge to keep cold.

Add to the bowl of a food processor:
3 c. flour
1 tsp. salt

Pulse a few times to mix well.

Add:
1/3 c. refrigerated lard
the diced butter

Pulse a few times until the butter and lard are about pea-sized.

With the motor running pour in 1/2 c. ice water, or a little more if needed until the dough forms a ball and pulls away from the sides.
Turn out onto a floured board, roll into a ball, and cut in half. Put the halves into sandwich bags and place one in the 'fridge for about 30 minutes before rolling for the pumpkin pie. Place the other crust in the freezer for another time.
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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  jumiclads on 11/23/2010, 8:04 am

I have never tried pumpkin pie. Can you describe what it tastes like. Thanks for the recipe, I will pass it on to my daughter who loves baking. You never know she may suprise me with a slice. Smile
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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  happyfrog on 11/23/2010, 8:17 am

it's similar in texture to a typical custard. only d/t to the combo of flavors (cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, cloves, ginger) americans think of pumpkin when they smell/taste those aforementioned.

the pumpkin adds the density to the dessert.

if you enjoy custard style desserts, i think you'd really like pumpkin pie.

when people talk about a can of pumpkin puree - that usually translates to 2 cups or 454 grams (if i remember my conversion correctly) of cooked pumpkin.

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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  happyfrog on 11/23/2010, 8:19 am

and btw, yum! your recipe looks really tasty - i don't usually use brown sugar (or combo of molasses/white sugar) in my pumpkin pie though - - but i can see how that would be a lovely addition!

thanks for sharing!!!

i think i might throw in a bit of molasses next time i bake my pumpkin pie to try.


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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  LaFee on 11/23/2010, 8:27 am

Jumiclads, Americans are the odd ones out on pumpkin -- we very rarely eat it as a savoury dish, but almost always add sugar and spices! Pumpkin pie originated from 17th century pudding recipes from England, using pumpkin because it was there!

You won't be able to buy tinned pumpkin in the UK, as far as I know - but a big chunk of soup pumpkin can be roasted and pureed to end up with the same thing. I find it take about a kilo of raw pumpkin to make 2 cups (500ml) of pumpkin puree.

Nobody I know has ever tried it and NOT liked it. The French, in particular, are used to pumpkin in savoury recipes, so they tend to back away from the sweet recipe...then once they've been convinced to try it, LOVE it.


More things you'll need to know before trying this in your kitchen:

You can substitute treacle for the sorghum molasses.
The sugar is caster sugar.
1 can of pumpkin is about 1 cup = 250ml
450 degrees (F) is about 220C, then turned down to 350F=180C

For the pastry recipe:
about 175g butter for 75g flour (NOT self-rising) and 75g lard and 125ml ice water.

Look here: http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking for a quick way to convert ingredients and their measurements.




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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  duhh on 11/23/2010, 4:52 pm

All of our exchange students (germany, itally, switz, norway) while I was growing up loved Thanksgiving because of the pumpkin pie! None had ever had it. Any time they come to visit the requset that we make it. When we go to visit them, we take canned pumpkin to make it there! That and stuff to make mexican food! It's been years since we've been to Europe though!
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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  jumiclads on 11/23/2010, 4:59 pm

Thanks for the info everyone. I will pass it on and see if my daughter can cook us up a pie. Smile
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Spice mixture for pumpkin (or sweet 'tater) pie

Post  Nonna.PapaVino on 6/21/2012, 9:16 pm

Years ago in Portland, Oregon, was a restaurant, called Hillvilla Pie Co., which regularly sold-out for meal/dessert reservations. After it finally closed, the recipe for their pumpkin pie spice mixture was published in The Oregonian newspaper. I've mixed this up every year for fall pies and pumpkin bread. Believe it or not, the black pepper is the secret. Here's the original recipe:

4 Tblsp. ground cinnamon

2 Tblsp ground allspice

2 Tblsp. black pepper

2 Tblsp salt

1 Tblsp ground nutmeg

1 Tblsp ground cloves

1 Tblsp ground ginger



Mix all together and store in tightly capped bottle. Makes about 3/4 cup. For each pumpkin or sweet potato pie, 2-1/2 tsp. (or a bit more to taste).



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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  littlejo on 6/21/2012, 10:38 pm

Nonna, thanks for the receipe and bringing this post to the front. My pie pumpkins have had squash bugs and the vines are possibly dying. I have a very orange pumpkin on the counter. I was thinking of putting it up for Nov. but, how bout a pumpkin pie for July 4, along with corn on the cob and hot dogs? My DH would call it crazy, but, I can smell it already!



Jo
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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  wilson on 6/21/2012, 11:15 pm

Thanks for the Recipe,


I am definitely going to try this. it sounds great.

I have had pumpkin pie once as a child, and remember
really liking it. Pumpkin pie isn't made very much
here in Oz.

One question (might be dumb) how much is 2c does
c =cup? sounds like a lot of sugar. Ooops just read
back and realise 2/3 of one cup.....yes? Laughing


I picked 50 butternut pumpkins from my 3 vines this year,
so have plenty of produce to practice with Very Happy
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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  Nonna.PapaVino on 6/22/2012, 10:41 am

Wilson, the recipe I posted is just for the spice seasoning mix, and you use about 1 to 1-1/2 teaspoons (to taste) per pie recipe. After preparing, rolling out, and putting pastry in a pie plate, I throw the pie filling ingredients in the food processor, give it a good mix, and pour it into the pastry shell. Place in preheated 425 degree F. oven for 15 minutes, then turn oven temperature down to 350 degrees F. for a further 45 minutes, or until the center of the pie proves done (slip blade of knife into center, withdraw and it should be clean, indicating the pumpkin custard has fully set up).

Filling ingredients:
2 large eggs
1-3/4 cups Australian Butter squash, roasted dry, peeled, cut into chunks for measuring
3/4 cups sugar
scant 1 teaspoon salt
1-1/2 teaspoon spice mixture
1-2/3 cup evaporated milk

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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  Nonna.PapaVino on 6/22/2012, 9:58 pm

littlejo, I love your idea of an all-American tradition (pumpkin or sweet potato pie) for the Fourth of July. Hmmmm, another package of frozen Aussie Butter squash becomes PIE! Nonna

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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  wilson on 6/23/2012, 3:36 am

Thanks Nonna,

I am definitely going to turn some of my Butternut pumpkins into pumpkin pie Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

Cheers Wilson
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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  littlejo on 6/23/2012, 8:13 am

I'm really leaning toward pie for the 4th! I always grow the pie pumpkins for they are good and they are small for my sfg. But you've mentioned Aussie butter squash. Is this a good flavor for pie? I am looking to try new stuff. Is this large or small?

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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  Nonna.PapaVino on 6/23/2012, 10:51 am

The Australian Butter squash has become our favorite for pies, soups, pumpkin bread--any recipe that calls for pumpkin puree--because it actually has a buttery flavor and purees to a smooth consistency with no stringiness. The fruits can become quite large, which makes them excellent for freezing or canning. Last year we had one that weighed close to 16 pounds! (Of course, for whatever reason, it was the only fruit on that particular vine.) Squat Johnson's current success with this variety is much more usual: three or four good-sized squash.

Last year was a year to experiment with heirloom winter squashes: Australian Butter, Potimarron, Musquee de Provence, and Galeux d'Eysines (which the grandkids call 'Bumpkins" for the warts that form all over the salmon-colored fruits). In our experience, the Aussie Butter and Potimarron were the clear winners for the table, Bumpkin for Halloween.

A word on Potimarron: Lovely dark orange fruits, just the right size to cook for dinner. Sliced in half, seeded and roasted with a marmalade-butter-fresh ginger treatment makes a delicious side dish. It, too, has a lovely, smooth texture. BTW, it looks and tastes very much like the Japanese red Kuri squash. Twins separated at birth? Nonna

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Re: Grandma's Pumpkin Pie

Post  weonlycut on 7/26/2012, 3:44 am

My daughter has never tried this before. I'll forward the recipe and will enjoy the pumpkin pie Smile
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