Square Foot Gardening Forum

Hello Guest!
Welcome to the official Square Foot Gardening Forum.
There's lots to learn here by reading as a guest. However, if you become a member (it's free, ad free and spam-free) you'll have access to our large vermiculite databases, our seed exchange spreadsheets, Mel's Mix calculator, and many more members' pictures in the Gallery. Enjoy.


Search
 
 

Display results as :
 

 


Rechercher Advanced Search

Latest topics
» N&C Midwest: December 2016
by Scorpio Rising Today at 10:28 pm

» New England, December 2016
by Scorpio Rising Today at 10:19 pm

» Anyone out there tried crosne tubers?
by GardenGal Today at 8:35 pm

» Mid-South: December 2016
by yolos Today at 5:57 pm

» TrolleyDriver's Compost Thermometer
by trolleydriver Today at 5:21 pm

» CANADIAN REGION: What are you doing December 2016
by trolleydriver Today at 5:12 pm

» Tomato Tuesday 2016
by AtlantaMarie Today at 4:41 pm

» Happy Birthday!!
by PVPind Today at 12:13 pm

» Holy snow Batman!
by donnainzone5 Today at 12:13 pm

» Butterfly Junction
by countrynaturals Today at 11:44 am

» Garlic: Freeze, thaw, and heave
by camprn Today at 7:05 am

» Garbanzo (Chickpeas, Cicer arietinum) and Kidney Beans
by BeetlesPerSqFt Yesterday at 11:28 pm

» Northern California & Coastal Valleys - What are you doing this month?
by countrynaturals Yesterday at 10:43 pm

» What are you eating from your garden today?
by Scorpio Rising Yesterday at 9:43 pm

» Second Year SFG in Canada
by trolleydriver Yesterday at 9:41 pm

» CHALLENGE - Smallest possible footprint
by Kelejan Yesterday at 5:19 pm

» GF Collard Greens, Kale Recipes
by BeetlesPerSqFt Yesterday at 12:49 pm

» 2016 SFG in Brooks, Ga
by sanderson Yesterday at 11:48 am

» Bon fires on the Levee
by Cajun Cappy 12/6/2016, 12:17 pm

» Mid-Atl - Dec 2016 - Seed Catalog ?
by Scorpio Rising 12/5/2016, 10:24 pm

» Gardening in Central Pennsylvania
by Scorpio Rising 12/5/2016, 10:21 pm

» 1st Seed Catalog Arrived :)
by Scorpio Rising 12/5/2016, 10:15 pm

» Amaranth
by countrynaturals 12/5/2016, 12:06 pm

» Live and learn
by jimmy cee 12/5/2016, 9:08 am

» AtlantaMarie's Garden
by countrynaturals 12/4/2016, 2:04 pm

» Mychorrhizae Fungi
by audrey.jeanne.roberts 12/4/2016, 1:28 pm

» December 2016 Avatar: Show your Winter Season Colors!
by Scorpio Rising 12/3/2016, 11:17 pm

» SFG not giving the results I expected
by No_Such_Reality 12/3/2016, 7:21 pm

» New Member
by trolleydriver 12/3/2016, 4:14 pm

» First season SFG results / lessons learned
by countrynaturals 12/3/2016, 10:36 am

Google

Search SFG Forum

multiple season sowing?

View previous topic View next topic Go down

multiple season sowing?

Post  Feistywidget on 12/22/2011, 12:03 am

Just to clarify, this isn't successive planting. Since growing season here is so short (starts in April/May ends in Sept.-Nov. depending on weather) I'd like to plant early, mid, and late season varieties of veggies all at the same time to extend harvest.
Early maturing stuff would be cold tolerant, as well as germinate better in cool soils. Mid and late season stuff would be tolerant to hot temps.

It would be two varieties for veggies that take longer to mature, early and late season. For stuff that matures more quickly, three types...early, mid, and late season. When I refer to how many types, it's all the same veggie, referring to maturity time when I say different types....not two different veggies.

Stuff I'd like to use this method for is cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, beans, lettuce, and possibly root veggies.

Feistywidget

Posts : 53
Join date : 2011-10-01
Location : Boyne City Michigan (gardening zone 5; short growing season....mild and cool climate...hot summers, but much milder than summers in tropical gardening zones)

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  BackyardBirdGardner on 12/22/2011, 12:17 am

I don't understand whether or not you're trying to ask a question, or just make a statement?

BackyardBirdGardner

Male Posts : 2727
Join date : 2010-12-25
Age : 42
Location : St. Louis, MO

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  walshevak on 12/22/2011, 8:37 am

We all try different ways to get the longest harvests from our spaces. If this works, good on.

____________________________

A WEED IS A FLOWER GROWING IN THE WRONG PLACE
Elizabeth City, NC
Find more about Weather in Elizabeth City, NC
Click for weather forecast

walshevak

Certified SFG Instructor

Female Posts : 4310
Join date : 2010-10-17
Age : 73
Location : wilmington, nc zone 8

View user profile

Back to top Go down

clarification

Post  Feistywidget on 12/22/2011, 11:42 am

No, I wasn't just making a statement. I was just explaining why I want to do it, and if I were going to, how I'd go about doing so.

I don't know if sowing multiseason season veggies at the same will work. That's why I'm asking advice. Have limited area, even with SFG, want to use it carefully.

I've never done successsive plantings; this isn't the same , it is similar.

Feistywidget

Posts : 53
Join date : 2011-10-01
Location : Boyne City Michigan (gardening zone 5; short growing season....mild and cool climate...hot summers, but much milder than summers in tropical gardening zones)

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  BackyardBirdGardner on 12/22/2011, 3:17 pm

I think your idea will work to a degree. If one plant matures in 90 days and another in 120, but you plant on the same day....you've effectively staggered your harvest. Nothing wrong with that.

However, nature always ruins the best laid plans. And, for example, carrots....they never mature according to the package. The days to harvest on a pack of seeds is always a guesstimate because they ship nationally and can't account for every climate.

If you want maxx value for a square...all season long....look into Swiss Chard. That stuff is tough. And, it grows and grows. I don't like the flavor, personally, but if you do, it would be a mainstay in your garden from the sounds of it.

BackyardBirdGardner

Male Posts : 2727
Join date : 2010-12-25
Age : 42
Location : St. Louis, MO

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  Lavender Debs on 12/22/2011, 4:37 pm

I think that I understand what you are doing.

I put in an early season broccoli (nutri-bud) and a main season (Thompsons). Both are OP, both are started and transplanted the same day. Nutri-bud gives me spring broccoli, and keeps me in side shoots until Thompsons is ready for harvest. Then both Thompsons and Nutri-bud keep me in side shoots until the greenbeans are coming on.

With green beans I put in purple-brown seed bush beans in late spring. I guess you could say that I succession plant white seeded and pole beans in early summer BUT the purple seed bush beans come on strong a good two to three weeks before the white seed bush beans come, followed a couple of weeks later by the skinny little french green beans I favor.

I do not find a significant difference in harvest dates with fava beans or peas. The one seriously early pea plant I've grown is not really a pleasant pea for eating, though it makes amazing pea shoots or greens in salad and stir-fry. I also find that potatoes need a spring season and a summer season.

My lettuce is all cut and come again so season length doesn't matter, just a mass of wild colors. I'm not good with cauliflower, I'm just happy if I get some. Small early cabbages work best in my SFG. About july cabbages cannot outgrow the slug population AND late season cabbage takes up too much room.

With onions, everything goes in early spring. I harvest the sweets (and other thinning) all summer long. Late fall I cure and pull most of what I have but I leave the leeks in the box AFTER I throw on a few shovels of compost and a thick layer of leaves. That gives me fresh onions that seem to last until the chives pop up in spring.

Debs…..your mileage may vary.

WINTER SOWING SEASON STARTS TODAY (DECEMBER 22)

Lavender Debs

Posts : 2054
Join date : 2010-03-03
Age : 59
Location : Everett, WA USA

View user profile http://songs-of-coming-rain.blogspot.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  Feistywidget on 12/22/2011, 6:24 pm

Well I did have questions about root veggies. I know carrots take awhile, both germinating and growing. However I'm wondering if it's possible to grow early, mid-season and late season varieties.

I'm wondering if you could grow them in early spring (for me, mid-late April, weather cooperating) or would it be too cold? I have the same questions about other root veggies as well (excluding stuff that takes ages.......rutabaga, parsnip).

I'm also thinking of doing multiple season crops with stuff like melons, cukes, and summer and winter squash. However I"m wondering if this is even necessary since they're all so prolific (provided you get adequate pollination).

I've also been tempted to do so with okra. People say it's an all-season crop, but I've found a variety I could pair with an early maturing variety, called silver queen, which takes about 80 days to mature.

Feistywidget

Posts : 53
Join date : 2011-10-01
Location : Boyne City Michigan (gardening zone 5; short growing season....mild and cool climate...hot summers, but much milder than summers in tropical gardening zones)

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  plantoid on 12/22/2011, 6:40 pm

Here in the UK we have an average time to plant that corresponds with a 100 mile wide band across the country from Cambridge to North Wales .. a bit like your zones .
Some of the better the seedsmen say for sowing times allow 1 to 1 & 1/4 days extra for each 100 miles north you go and take off 1 1/4 days for each 100 miles you go South .

Cropping times also usually alter but again the seedsmen might have data for you if you ask


Perhaps you could write , email or phone the seed suppliers for this sort of advice

I know only too well how the colder climes affect things , you might consider adapting to the conditions perhaps by using this little idea .

You can speed up things by germinating seed in something like KY gel personal lubricant which is available from chemists, it is sterile and is non toxic .
Or make your own from any of the commonly available powdered seaweed food / jelly thickener proteins .

Simply drop a few seeds into a teaspsoon of made up solution ( or more depending on what you're wanting to do ) into a corner of clear thin plastic bag , losely tie the bag with some air in it and let the seed germinate in a warm dark cupboard for a few days & grow a small shoot about four times the length of the seed .

Then in a pre prepared area sow a sprouted seed in a bit of the gel by snippng off a small corrner of the plastic bag and gently squeezing the right amount of sprouted seed and jelly out the bag into the indentation where you want the seed to grow . Now lightly cover the seed with the growth medium .
You can use the back of a small spoon in a larger spoon of seed and gel to separate a bunch of the sprouted seed into individual plants seeds , don't actually touch the seedlings with your hands as I found it frequently kills them .
.
I found if I lined up the sprouted seeds in the plastic bag by gently manipulating them into a line along the bottom fold so when you squeeze the sprouted seed and jelly out you can get individual sprouted seeds one a time in the right place .

It didnt work very well with a large bore hypodermic syrynge unless I was planning for a line of sprouted seeds.

You can save weeks at a time doing this out of the ground method for all sorts of veg or flowers especially carrots or small seed beds of transplantable brassicas etc.

Not only does the seedling grow well the jelly carries water and absorbs water for the new plant till the stuff breaks down naturally .

plantoid

Male Posts : 3636
Join date : 2011-11-09
Age : 65

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  janezee on 12/23/2011, 4:56 am



................................ rofl


............................................. rofl


.......................................................... rofl
good idea

janezee

Female Posts : 242
Join date : 2011-09-21
Age : 109
Location : Away

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  fiddleman on 12/24/2011, 1:35 pm

If I understand your question correctly, you're looking for varieties which would naturally provide the staggered harvest since they would take longer to mature. Sometimes the additional time allows the sugars to collect giving a more flavorful product. One example comes quickly to mind, late season types of corn seems more sweet to me than early corn.

Again, the variety of seed you're using, health of the plant and planting conditions (sun, temp, water, nutrient, pest loads) will have more to do with the final product than anything else... that said however, from my experience...

Lettuce (leaf)... Black Seeded Simpson is a dependable early season lettuce maturing at least 1 - 2 weeks before my other favorite varieties of Grand Rapids (American Seed) and Vivian. The last Leaf lettuce I plant is Summer Sensation which is very heat tolerant here in Michigan, easily handling our summer weather, and if harvested regularly and watered well doesn't turn bitter. Summer Sensation isn't as tender as Grand Rapids, but when the temps have warmed up too much for the others, it shrugs it off and keeps on producing just fine.


Carrots-Short and Sweet is my go-to variety. Earlier than other carrots, is meant to harvest "stubby" and doesn't get all woody, all this with great sweet carrot flavor. Red Chantanay works well here too, though it matures 3 weeks later.

Snow peas have matured faster than the sugar snap peas, for me.

Early Girl is a good dependable early season variety, but there are a great many tomatoes varieties out there. Heirloom to the newest hybrids there are a range of harvest dates to be had.

I haven't done a lot of root type vegetables over the years, although I am finally changing that... last year I had a quite successful harvest of potatoes with 5lbs of seed potatoes - we ended up with nearly 20lbs of the best tasting taters I've ever had. It was a test to see how they'd grow in my yard (TALL!) and so this year I plan to devote a much larger area to them. I'm also going to give rutabaga's a try, as well as maybe another shot at radishes and onions (these last two always seem to go too hot before they mature).

Well, there's a couple of ideas anyway from someone whose weather is somewhat similar to yours.

Mark

fiddleman

Male Posts : 121
Join date : 2011-03-21
Location : Mid Michigan

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  llama momma on 12/24/2011, 1:43 pm

@janezee wrote:

................................ rofl


............................................. rofl


.......................................................... rofl
good idea

cheers Hah! Creativity is a wonderful thing !

llama momma

Certified SFG Instructor

Female Posts : 4642
Join date : 2010-08-20
Age : 59
Location : Central Ohio zone 6a

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: multiple season sowing?

Post  Sponsored content Today at 10:51 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum